• SBA Has a Lien on My Home. If I Default will I Lose My Home?

    2 October 2018
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    In many states, it is standard practice for an SBA lender to ask a loan guarantor to pledge their home as collateral in connection with their unconditional guaranty. If the business loan you guarantee goes into default, your homestead could be at risk of foreclosure. However, the SBA may not always urge a lender to foreclosure on your home, even if the SBA and the SBA Lender have a legal right to do so. Here are a few factors that may impact this decision:

    Do you have a first mortgage on your home ahead of the SBA loan? This may help you.

    The general rule in property law is that liens have priority in the order that they are filed in the county records office. This is known as the first in time, first in right rule. Based on this principle, a recorded interest has priority over later recorded interests. If your first mortgage is ahead of the SBA loan, it will make foreclosure less attractive to the SBA Lender since foreclosure proceeds must first be applied to payoff the first mortgage entirely, plus the costs of foreclosure before the second mortgage holder receives anything.

    If your home equity is zero or very low, it may be that the SBA lender will choose to do nothing for now and wait hoping the home will increase in value over time. In many cases, if this occurs, a foreclosure may not be initiated for years and then only if the value of your home has substantially increased and some factor has brought this to the attention of your SBA Lender or the SBA.

    What is Home Equity?

    Home equity is the market value of a homeowner’s unencumbered interest in their real property, that is, the difference between the home’s fair market value and the outstanding balance of all liens on the property. For example, if your home is worth $225,000 and you have a first mortgage to Bank X for $100,000, then you have $125,000 of “Equity” in your property and, in an SBA default situation, that might tempt the SBA Lender or the SBA to foreclose. However, if you add a second mortgage of $75,000, then you only have $50,000 of equity in your property and, in a foreclosure setting, this may not be enough for the SBA Lender (in a third position behind your second mortgage) to foreclose. Be sure to review all your mortgage debt with your attorney if you are discussing the consequences of an SBA loan default.

    Can I make the SBA or the SBA Lender an Offer to Release My Home as Collateral?

    Yes, you can make the SBA Lender an Offer in Compromise to settle your total liability associated with your personal guaranty or you can just make an offer for the release of the lien on your home. But, use caution. If you obtain a release of SBA Lender’s lien on your home without also completely settling your liability under your personal guaranty, you might later be sued by the SBA Lender. If the SBA Lender obtains a judgment, and then places a judgment lien on you real property, your home may be at risk all over again.

    Handling the release of an SBA lien on your home correctly may require professional assistance. It is important to consider this action as a part of your overall strategy. In many cases, it may be possible to combine the release of the lien on your home as part of your complete offer in compromise settlement package. But, many variables can affect the outcome, so be sure to discuss your goals completely with your attorney and/or CPA.

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  • I want to buy a new home. Will the SBA allow me to substitute the lien on my old residence for a new one?

    16 August 2015
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    Yes, it is possible, but the SBA does not have to do so. SBA guidelines do allow a Guarantor to substitute a lien on a new residence in exchange for releasing the lien on the Guarantor’s existing residence. However, at a minimum, the following conditions must be satisfied:

    A. All of the proceeds from the sale of the Guarantor’s existing residence, other than the funds needed to pay off senior liens and necessary, reasonable and customary closing costs, must be used to purchase the new residence, placed in an escrow account to facilitate the purchase of a new residence, or used to pay down the SBA Loan;

    B. The amount of equity in the new residence available to secure the SBA loan must be the same as or greater than the amount of equity in the existing residence available to secure the SBA loan;

    C. The release of the existing lien, or proceeds thereof, must be concurrent with the recording of the new lien in the required position of priority and should be done pursuant to an escrow agreement signed by all of the parties involved in the transaction; and

    D. Guarantor must provide the title, hazard and flood insurance.

    If you would like more information on this subject, you may contact the Perliski Law Group at (214) 446-3934 for a free initial consultation.

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