• SBA Loan Assumptions: The Devil is in the Details

    9 October 2017
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    Scenario 1. My business may close because I don’t have enough working capital.

    If you are facing an SBA loan default, then you may want to consider selling your business. If your business has a good track record, but your business is starved for working capital, a loan assumption may be an option. In some cases your loan may be assumable by a third-party buyer who can then step into your shoes, purchasing both the assets and assuming the debt creating a win-win for you and the bank.

    Scenario 2. My business is doing well and we want to sell, but we have an SBA loan outstanding.

    When you start a business, apart from the income it generates, there is always a need for an exit strategy. It may be that you need to move to take advantage of new opportunities or simply retire. When you have an outstanding SBA loan, you may be able to work with your bank to sell the business and achieve those goals. However, as with the first scenario, you need to be sure you really have “exited” and that no further personal liability exists under the unconditional personal guarantee you signed when the SBA loan was originated.

    My loan was assumed, so why should it matter if the new borrower defaults?

    Your bank will likely be happy to help facilitate a loan assumption to avoid a default. And, you banker may also be willing to work with you to help facilitate an exit for retirement. Certainly, this sounds like a win-win situation for all parties. However, the devil is in the details. It is important that you work very closely with your attorney to ensure that the SBA actually releases you from the unconditional personal guaranty you signed when you originated the loan. One would think that would be the default result, but that is not the case.

    If the new borrower defaults, the bank may certainly pursue them and the new guarantors; however, if neither the new borrower or the new guarantors pay up, and instead file bankruptcy, then the bank may still have recourse against you. In order to avoid this dire situation, you and your attorney should read the fine print of the legal documents together and confirm that you are expressly released. Your banker may also think that that you are released, but it is the fine print in the final documents that count. Remember, the bank, well meaning or not, does not represent you. You must look to yourself and your own attorney to protect your interests.

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  • I guaranteed my brother’s SBA loan and he defaulted. Can I still get an SBA loan of my own?

    4 October 2015
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    The answer depends on whether or not you satisfied your obligations to the federal government. If you signed an Unconditional Personal Guaranty for a commercial loan backed by the Small Business Administration (SBA), then you are responsible for the payment of the debt in the event your brother does not or cannot pay. In due course, the SBA will send you a notice letter that is effectively a demand for payment. If you do not pay the debt or make suitable arrangements agreeable to the SBA, then the debt will be referred to the U.S. Treasury Department for further collection activity.

    Apart from being placed into the Treasury Offset Program (TOP) and being exposed to tax refund intercept, administrative wage garnishment and the offset of other federal benefit payments like social security, you will be placed into the Credit Alert Interactive Voice Response System (CAIVRS).

    CAIVRS receives inputs from DOJ, Education, SBA, HUD, USDA and the VA. CAIVRS Reporting System is a system maintained by the federal government that lists persons who have defaulted or had a loan foreclosed within the last three years on a debt owed to the Federal government or are currently delinquent on a debt owed to the Federal government. When you apply for an SBA Loan, participating lenders are required to check the CAIVRS database to determine whether the individuals or businesses identified in applying for the loan have either a delinquent federal debt or a prior loss which bar them from SBA financial assistance.

    The government has a long memory and there is no statue of limitations on the collection of an unpaid non-tax treasury debt under the TOP program. So, before you sign on the dotted line, think hard. if the government takes a loss, you will be barred from the SBA loan program.

    If you would like more information on this subject, you may contact the Perliski Law Group at (214) 446-3934 for a free initial consultation.

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  • How can I still be liable to the SBA when my ex-wife assumed this debt in the divorce?

    29 January 2015
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    There’s no way around it: divorce is stressful. During this often ugly process the soon to be ex-spouses battle it out and in the end arrive at a division of property and debt that they both agree upon. It is on the assumption that this hard-won agreement represents the last word on their personal liability for martial debts that most people depend. Sadly, these agreements are not worth very much when the obligor’s finances deteriorate.

    Joint and Several Liability

    Whether or not your ex-spouse agreed to be solely responsible for an SBA Debt, if both spouses were guarantors on the SBA loan, then the SBA has a right to pursue either spouse for the full amount of the outstanding debt; this sad fact is a result of what is referred to as joint and several liability. And, although the SBA can only collect the full amount of the debt once, both ex-spouses remain guarantors on the original debt — that is, unless one of them settles with the SBA first.

    That Hard-Won Agreement with your Ex-Spouse is Not Binding on your Creditors

    The simple fact is that you divorced your husband/wife, not your creditors; they were not parties to your divorce and had no say in your agreement. Therefore, agree all you like with your ex-spouse, if he or she fails to pay off the full balance of the remaining SBA debt, you will be asked to do so. In many instances, years can pass before the SBA gets around to sending a 60-day Notice Letter making the event all the more traumatic with many a person prone to ignore it. But, it would be a grave mistake to ignore this notice — it may well be the only opportunity for you to settle the debt on reasonable terms before it is transferred to the U.S. Treasury where settlement terms are harsh and deals few and far between.

    The financial collapse of a family business can often lead to divorce. Work out a realistic plan to address the SBA debt or the U.S. Treasury will ultimately work one out fore you.

    Forewarned is forearmed.

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