• SBA Loan Assumptions: The Devil is in the Details

    9 October 2017
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    Scenario 1. My business may close because I don’t have enough working capital.

    If you are facing an SBA loan default, then you may want to consider selling your business. If your business has a good track record, but your business is starved for working capital, a loan assumption may be an option. In some cases your loan may be assumable by a third-party buyer who can then step into your shoes, purchasing both the assets and assuming the debt creating a win-win for you and the bank.

    Scenario 2. My business is doing well and we want to sell, but we have an SBA loan outstanding.

    When you start a business, apart from the income it generates, there is always a need for an exit strategy. It may be that you need to move to take advantage of new opportunities or simply retire. When you have an outstanding SBA loan, you may be able to work with your bank to sell the business and achieve those goals. However, as with the first scenario, you need to be sure you really have “exited” and that no further personal liability exists under the unconditional personal guarantee you signed when the SBA loan was originated.

    My loan was assumed, so why should it matter if the new borrower defaults?

    Your bank will likely be happy to help facilitate a loan assumption to avoid a default. And, you banker may also be willing to work with you to help facilitate an exit for retirement. Certainly, this sounds like a win-win situation for all parties. However, the devil is in the details. It is important that you work very closely with your attorney to ensure that the SBA actually releases you from the unconditional personal guaranty you signed when you originated the loan. One would think that would be the default result, but that is not the case.

    If the new borrower defaults, the bank may certainly pursue them and the new guarantors; however, if neither the new borrower or the new guarantors pay up, and instead file bankruptcy, then the bank may still have recourse against you. In order to avoid this dire situation, you and your attorney should read the fine print of the legal documents together and confirm that you are expressly released. Your banker may also think that that you are released, but it is the fine print in the final documents that count. Remember, the bank, well meaning or not, does not represent you. You must look to yourself and your own attorney to protect your interests.

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  • Avoiding Default under an SBA Offer in Compromise

    13 November 2016
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    If the Small Business Administration (SBA) has accepted your offer in compromise, then congratulations are in order. But, be warned, you must follow the terms of your offer precisely and make all payments on time or risk default. In many cases we are approached by well intentioned people who established settlements with the SBA calling for payment of the settlement in equal consecutive monthly installments; however, for one reason or another they missed a payment or two. Missing a payment can have disastrous consequences and result in a referral to Treasury, the imposition of additional collection fees adding nearly 30% to your original debt, less a credit for your prior settlement payments and the resumption of interest on the uncollected balance (this assuming the SBA agreed to zero interest settlement for you).

    I knew a default was bad news – what can I do?

    If you have been advised that your SBA OIC is in default you must act quickly. It may not be possible to get the original settlement back by simply making up the missing payments and a new SBA Offer in Compromise may need to be submitted. There are simply too many variables in these cases and consulting a licensed attorney with experience in this area should seriously be considered.

    Missing a payment and paying ahead are both equally dangerous

    How can paying ahead be bad? When the SBA accepted your offer to pay in installments, it programmed its computers to look for payment in accordance with its terms; in most cases equal, consecutive, monthly payments of an exact amount are called for under the agreement. Many people concerned about defaulting think that paying ahead can protect them from default by establishing a cushion of sort. However, that is a very dangerous train of thought. In fact, all you will do is pay down the balance and in effect short the remaining duration of your agreement (much like paying a mortgage off earlier), but the next month’s payment will still be due. When the SBA’s computers fail to register payment, you are at risk of default and the account may be referred to Treasury (this process is highly automated).

    If you have paid ahead on your offer, but nonetheless received a notice of default, you should contact the SBA at once and explain the situation or consult with a licensed attorney experienced in this area. Although it may seem unfair, the government may strictly enforce the terms of your settlement to the letter. Instead of appreciating the gesture on your part, they may refer the debt to Treasury! Remember, SBA computers do a lot of this work and once transferred to Treasury, the SBA staffers may be unwilling to even discuss the matter.

    Can I pay off my settlement early?

    If your payment will completely pay off your settlement, then you may be able to do so safely, but you should contact the SBA or advise your attorney before doing so. The terms of your offer control and making a mistake can cost you dearly.

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